Behaviour


Behaviour 


Today, behaviour problems kill more pets than any infectious disease process. Every year millions of pets are abandoned, relinquished, abused and neglected. Many of them end up in shelters, in the street or killed. An important number of these individuals could be saved if owners were better informed about their pet's behavioural needs through reliable and educated sources. Pets are an integral part of  family life and their unwanted behaviour cause their human family distress, which in turn may lead to relinquishment and euthanasia.


Veterinarians play a vital role in guiding pet owners in the right direction. Behviour problems can involve complex conditions that require behaviour counselling, home visits and regular follow up by a diplomed and trained professional. This is where qualified animal behaviourists can help.


Lives can be saved and human-animal relationships can be repaired.


Mitch

Unwanted and problematic behaviours

reported by pet-owners :

Dogs

  • Aggression (fear, defensive, to humans/animals)
  • Reactivity (scanning, barking, fearful, nervous)
  • Anxiety/Separation-anxiety
  • Fear (of people/animals, places/objects, outdoors)
  • Attention-seeking
  • Phobias (noise, thunderstorm, fireworks)
  • House-soiling
  • Marking
  • Destructive behaviour (chewing, scratching)
  • Resource guarding (food, objects, toys, people)
  • Hyperactivity
  • Licking (excessive)
  • Over-grooming
  • Uncontrolled/Rough play behaviour (biting)
  • Jumping (on people, animals, furniture, objects)
  • Digging
  • Tail-chasing/Spinning
  • Stealing (food, objects)
  • Vocalization (excessive barking, howling)
  • Mouthing (biting, nipping)
  • Pica (ingestion of non-food items)
  • Mounting (of animals, people, objects)
  • Travel-related problems
  • Predatory behaviour
  • Roaming
  • Nocturnal behaviour
  • Cognitive dysfunction
  • Compulsive disorders
  • Stereotypic behaviours
  • Medical conditions/Pain influencing behaviour
  • Genetic/Breed-specific conditions
  • Fear/Anxiety/Stress at the veterinarian practice
  • Multi-pet households
  • Introducing a new dog to a multi-pet household

Cats

  • Aggression (inter-cat, play, territorial, defensive)
  • Reactivity (fearful, nervous)
  • Anxiety/Separation-anxiety
  • Fear (of people/animals, places/objects, outdoors)
  • Attention-seeking
  • Phobias (noise, thunderstorm, fireworks)
  • House-soiling
  • Urine marking/Indoor spraying
  • Destructive play/Exploration behaviour
  • Scratching behaviour
  • Hyperactivity
  • Licking (excessive)
  • Over-grooming
  • Uncontrolled/Rough play behaviour (biting)
  • Jumping (on counters, furniture)
  • Digging
  • Tail-chasing/Spinning
  • Stealing (food, objects)
  • Vocalization
  • Biting
  • Pica (ingestion of non-food items)
  • Mounting (of animals, people, objects)
  • Travel-related problems
  • Predatory behaviour
  • Roaming
  • Nocturnal behaviour
  • Cognitive dysfunction
  • Stereotypic behaviours
  • Compulsive disorder
  • Medical conditions/Pain influencing behaviour
  • Genetic/Breed-specific conditions
  • Fear/Anxiety/Stress at the veterinarian practice
  • Multi-cat households
  • Introducing a new cat to a multi-pet household

Tau

CANIS

   

Dogs have been mankind's faithful companions for tens of thousands of years, yet today they are regularly treated as either pack-following wolves or furry humans.

The truth is, dogs are neither-and our misunderstanding has put them in serious crisis.


by John Bradshaw

FELES


Cats have been popular household pets for thousands of years, and their numbers only continue to rise. Today there are three cats for every dog on the planet, and yet cats remain more mysterious, even to their most adoring owners. Unlike dogs, cats evolved as solitary hunters, and, while many have learned to live alongside humans and even feel affection for us, they still don’t quite “get us” the way dogs do, and perhaps they never will. But cats have rich emotional lives that we need to respect and understand if they are to thrive in our company.  


by John Bradshaw


CONTACT


Tel: +32-474.690.012


Languages spoken:


English, French, Dutch/Flemish, Swedish, Finnish, German & Spanish.

APPOINTMENTS & CONDITIONS


Appointments can be made by mail, by phone or by filling out the online form at the bottom of the 'Contact' page on this web site. All sessions are conducted on appointment and individual basis (in multi-pet households several pets may be concerned).


The first session lasts about 2 hours and preferably takes place in the living environment of the animal.

This session costs 70 eur (incl. VAT) and includes a treatment plan proposal which will be sent to you by mail within a week of the session. Based on the outcome of the consultation and the proposed treatment plan we decide together how to proceed.


Consecutive sessions of 60-90 minutes cost 50 eur (incl.VAT). This includes follow up by mail accompanied by handouts and helpful sources. These sessions can be held in your home, in my premises, in a vet's practice or in another suitable location. Skype sessions are also possible in certain cases.



Practical matters

I do home visits all over Belgium.

A standard kilometer compensation of 0,50 eur/km will be applied outside of the Brussels-region.


Payment can be made directly after the session in cash or by bank transfer within a week of the session.


I may ask for a vet-check if I suspect a medical condition or pain influencing the behaviour of your pet.


A disclaimer document may be necessary for certain high-risk cases.


INVOICE


OTHELLO Bvba


40 Chemin d'Odrimont

1380 Lasne

Belgium


VAT: BE 0451.583.696


Bank Account:

BE75 4014 5351 7151

BIC: KEDBEBB


© Copyright 2017 - Annika Mattson